Treadmill Running Because of Typhoons

Treadmill running is a good habit in maintaining physical fitness when you cannot run outside your home.

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Source: Photo of our old, slightly damaged treadmill in a small area. Photo taken using my Lenovo A5000.

 

This is also a post reminding everyone to be alert for the bad weather conditions since typhoons are normal during these months especially here in the Philippines but these past few days, typhoons are happening in other countries with unexpected places getting flooded already because of the power of nature.

Due to typhoons, runners find ways to continue their training so as not to disrupt their schedules. As a runner, I find treadmill running to be the best alternative in case weather conditions are bad. Instead of letting the treadmill here collect clouds of dust and left to be broken, I might as well use it. The treadmill here is actually an old one with the timer and distance tracker already messed up. Instead of relying on it, I used my cell phone in tracking time.

In order to not get bored while treadmill running, I usually watch the news which usually lasts for 20 to 30 minutes before advertisements are shown. Another method that I do is to pray the Rosary by playing an audio mobile app.  This Holy Rosary mobile app is the one that I use. I also watch YouTube videos that would last for 30 to 45 minutes by searching for workout songs that motivate me to run more. Treadmill running is a good habit in maintaining physical fitness when you cannot run outside your home.

On a side note, I posted here typhoon names used by Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA which is the government agency tasked with providing protection from natural calamities by using scientific methods to safeguard the safety and well-being of Filipinos.

THE PHILIPPINE TROPICAL CYCLONE NAMES – 2009 to 2024

I II III IV
2009 2010 2011 2012
2013 2014 2015 2016
2017 2018 2019 2020
2021 2022 2023 2024
Auring Agaton Amang Ambo
Bising Basyang Betty Butchoy
Crising Caloy Chedeng Carina
Dante Domeng Dodong Dindo
Emong Ester Egay Enteng
Fabian Florita Falcon Ferdie
Gorio Gardo* Goring Gener
Huaning Henry Hanna Helen
Isang Inday Ineng Igme
Jolina Josie* Jenny Julian
Kiko Karding Kabayan Karen
Lannie Luis Lando Lawin
Maring Maymay* Marilyn Marce
Nando Neneng Nonoy Nina
Odette Ompong Onyok Ofel
Paolo Paeng Perla Pepito
Quedan Queenie Quiel Quinta
Ramil Rosita* Ramon Rolly
Salome Samuel* Sarah Siony
Tino Tomas Tisoy Tonyo
Urduja Usman Ursula Ulysses
Vinta Venus Viring Vicky
Wilma Waldo Weng Warren
Yasmin Yayang Yoyoy Yoyong
Zoraida Zeny Zigzag Zosimo
Auxilliary List
Alamid Agila Abe Alakdan
Bruno Bagwis Berto Baldo
Conching Chito Charo Clara
Dolor Diego Dado Dencio
Ernie Elena Estoy Estong
Florante Felino Felion Felipe
Gerardo Gunding Gening Gardo
Hernan Harriet Herman Heling
Isko Indang Irma Ismael
Jerome Jessa Jaime Julio

* – Replaced Name(s) Effective February 2015: Gardo for Glenda, Josie for Jose, Maymay for Mario, Rosita for Ruby, and Samuel for Seniang.

We have 4 categories of storm signals, namely
  1. Public Storm Warning Signal # 1 – Winds of 30-60 kph may be expected in at least 36 hours or intermittent rains may be expected within 36 hours.
  2. Public Storm Warning Signal # 2 – Winds of greater than 60 kph and up to 100 kph may be expected in at least 24 hours.
  3. Public Storm Warning Signal # 3 – Winds of greater than 100 kph up to 185 kph may be expected in at least 18 hours.
  4. Public Storm Warning Signal # 4 – Very strong winds of more than 185 kph may be expected in at least 12 hours.

A tropical cyclone is “a non-frontal, synoptic-scale cyclone developing over tropical and sub-tropical waters at any level and having a definitely organized circulation” and are termed as:

  • Hurricanes in the regions of North Atlantic, Eastern North Pacific, and South Pacific Ocean;
  • Cyclones in the regions of bay of Bengal, Arabian Sea, and Western South Indian Ocean;
  • Willy-willy in the eastern part of the Southern Indian Ocean; and
  • Typhoons in the regions of Western North Pacific Ocean which include the Philippines

Also, for reference purposes, the classification of tropical cyclones according to the strength of the associated winds as adopted by PAGASA as of 01 May 2015 are posted below which is a quoted post from PAGASA website.

  • TROPICAL DEPRESSION (TD) – a tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of up to 61 kilometers per hour (kph) or less than 33 nautical miles per hour (knots) .
  • TROPICAL STORM (TS) – a tropical cyclone with maximum wind speed of 62 to 88 kph or 34 – 47 knots.
  • SEVERE TROPICAL STORM (STS), a tropical cyclone with maximum wind speed of 89 to 117 kph or 48 – 63 knots.
  • TYPHOON (TY) – a tropical cyclone with maximum wind speed of 118 to 220 kph or 64 – 120 knots.
  • SUPER TYPHOON (STY), a tropical cyclone with maximum wind speed exceeding 220 kph or more than 120 knots.
If you want to get updated with the Philippine weather, you can download this mobile app developed by DOST for PAGASA or you can also try downloading the mobile app, Project NOAH (Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards) of the University of the Philippines and check their UP-NOAH website.
Source:
http://www.the12list.com/p/the-philippine-tropical-cyclone-names.html